Introduction

 

"There is in Suffolk within the sound of the Trinity House fog horn a remote hamlet reached by narrow high hedged lanes.Among it's few cottages and farms is a single inn, the Eels Foot. To the passer by this beer house, for that's all it is, is like many another country pub.It's small and undestinguished, except for it's curious name, but on Saturday evenings The Eels foot is the scene of a dramatic rite which after years of aquaintances is still exciting.

 

The bar, a room some 15 feet square with tables at either end, is full.Dance is impossible and at the end of one of the tables sits Philip Lumpkin under an oil lamp and in his hand is a cribbage scoreboard, one corner of which is strangely rounded.Near him is the fiddler with his concertina. He starts to play and Mrs Howard climbs onto the table and begins to dance.

 

This is the traditional overture to an evening of song over which Philip rules with his crib board for it's corner has been rounded by years of beating on the table to call for "Good Order, Good order ladies and gentlemen please"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

False Hearted Knight

 

(Philip Lumpkin) Up ladies and gentlemen please Jumbo is just going to give us The false hearted Knight if you don't mind please"

 

Now it's of a false knight who came from North land ,he came a courting me

He promised top take me down to the north land and there his bride make me

So come give me some of your mothers gold and some of your fathers fee

And two of the best horses out of her stable where there stand by thirty and three

So she mounted upon her milk white steed and he on his dapple and grey

And away they did ride to the great waterside So early before it was day

"Jump you off, jump you off that milk white steed and deliver it unto me

For six pretty fair maids I have drownded in here and the seventh one you shall be"

"Take off take off that silken gown And lay it upon yon stone

For I think it's too rich and I think it's to rare to rot all in the salt sea"

 

"Then if I must take off my silken gown then turn your back upon me

For I don't think it fit that a villain like you a naked woman should see

"And stoke you down and cut that briar that hangs so near that brim

For in case it should tangle my golden clothes oe'r and tear my lily white skin"

Then she gave him a push and a hearty push and she pushed that false knight in

Crying "lie in there you false hearted knight Lie in there instead of me

For if six pretty fair maids you have drowned in here the seventh one hath drowned you"

So she mounted upon the milk white steed and she's led his dapple and grey

And away she did ride to her father's own hall two hours before it was day

The old parrot was up in the window high and he cried aloud and did say

"I'm afraid that some villian came here last night and have carried my lady away"

Her father he was not so sound asleep and he heard what that bird did say

And he crieth "what waketh my pretty parrot hours before it was day"

"Why the old cat it was up in that window high and that cat he wouldn't make play

So loud did I cry that helped to deny to drive that cat away"

"Well done, well done my pretty Polly no tales will you tell on me

Thy cage shall be made of that bright beaten gold and a door of white ivory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Old Sow

 

(Announcer) Jumbo Brightwell, who sang that song is one of this generation singers who keep the tradition going by learning his father's songs"

 

(Philip Lumpkin) Order please now I think Fred is going to give us a little song of the pig.

 

Now there was an old farmer he had an old sow

(Snort) here, there, had an old sow, had an old sow

Now there was an old farmer he had an old sow

Sing I do whe'r a where um and there was an old man

With a (Snort) (rasberry) (whistle) a little old man

Now this old sow had the best of straw

(Snort) here, there, best of straw,best of straw

Now this old sow had the best of straw

Sing I do whe'r a where um and there was an old man

With a (Snort) (rasberry) (whistle) a little old man

 

Now this old sow had nine little pigs

(Snort) here, there, nine little pigs, nine little pigs

Now this old sow had nine little pigs

Sing I do whe'r a where um and there was an old man

With a (Snort) (rasberry) (whistle) a little old man

Now these nine little pigs had curly tails

(Snort) here, there, curly tails, curly tails

Now these nine little pigs had curly tails

Sing I do whe'r a where um and there was an old man

With a (Snort) (rasberry) (whistle) a little old man

 

Now these nine little pigs and their bottoms all bear

(Snort) here, there , arses all bear,arses all bear

Now these nine little pigs and their arses all bear

Sing I do whe'r a where um and there was an old man

With a (Snort) (rasberry) (whistle) a little old man

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Dark Eyed Sailor

 

(Philip Lumpkin) Ladies and gentlemen please just give us a little order this time if you don't mind in the passage. We're going to have a song from Jack, The dark eyed sailor if you donít mind please give us a little order in the passage if you don't mind".

 

Twas of a comely young lady fair

Twas walking out for to take the air

She met a sailor whilst on her way

So I paidiad attention, so I paid attention

So I paid attention to hear what they did say.

So I paid attention, so I paid attention

So I paid attention to hear what they did say.

 

He said "pray lady, why roam alone,

The day's fast spent and the night's coming on"

She said, whilst tears from her eyes did fall

"Twas the dark-eyed sailor,twas the dark-eyed sailor that prov-ed my down fall."

 

"Twas the dark-eyed sailor,

twas the dark-eyed sailor that prov-ed my down fall."

"'It's two long years since he left the land

A golden ring he took from off my hand

We broke the token here's part with me

Whilst the other lay rollin'

Whilst the other lay rollin' at the bottom of sea."

Whilst the other lay rollin'

Whilst the other lay rollin' at the bottom of sea."

 

Said William lady "Drive him from your mind

There's other sailors as good you'll find

Love turns aside and soon cold has grown

Like a winter's morning

Like a winter's morning, with the ground all covered with snow."

Like a winter's morning

Like a winter's morning, with the ground all covered with snow."

 

These words did Pheobe's young heart inflame

She said "up on me you shall play no game"

She drew her dagger and loud did cry

For my dark-eyed sailor

For my dark-eyed sailor a maid I live and die

For my dark-eyed sailor

For my dark-eyed sailor a maid I live and die

 

Now in a cottage down by the sea

They joined in wedlock and well agree

Oh maids be true whilst your love's away

For a cloudy morning

For a cloudy morning brings forth a sunshine day.

For a cloudy morning

For a cloudy morning brings forth a sunshine day.

 

(Announcer) Did you take notice of that, The dark eyed sailor, a song which has been thought to be an exclusive object of highbrow collectors. Here sung in a pub by thirty local who have known it all their lives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bold Princess Royal

 

(Philip Lumpkin) Order gentlemen please and ladies, Velvet is going to give us the Princess Royal.

 

On the fourteenth of February when we sailed from the land

In the bold "Princess Royal" bound for Newfoundland;

With forty bright seamen for our ship's company

Went so boldly from the Eastward to the Westward bore we

With forty bright seamen for our ship's company

Went so boldly from the Eastward to the Westward bore we

 

Now we had not been sailing scarce a day two or three

When a man at our masthead strange sails he did see,

She came bearing down up on us for to see what we were

And under her mizzen black colours she wore.

She came etc.

 

"Good Lord!" Cries our captain, "What shall we do now?

Here comes a bold pirate for to rob us, I know!."

"Oh no!" cries our chief mate, "That ne'er shall be so

We will shake out a reef or two and from her we'll go."

"Oh no etc.

 

At two hours sailing she hoved alongside

And with the loud-speaking trumpet, "Whence came you"" he cried,

Our captain he was aft and he answered him so:

"We came from fair London we are bound to Cairo"

Our captain etc.

 

"It's come haul in your course-sail lay your ship to

For I have got a letter to send home by you."

"I will haul in my course-sail, my ship I will lay to

But that will be in some harbour, not alongside of you."

"I will haul etc.

 

"Now come set your top gallant sails your stay sails likewise

Top to gallant sail royal " and from her we flew

They fired shots after us but now took prevail

When the Bold Princess Royal soon shew them her tail

They fired etc.

 

Now they chased us to windward then all that long day

They chased us to windward but they could make no way;

They chased us to windward 'til they could make no way;

And then they hauled up their mail-sail and then bore away

Now "Good Lord!" cries our captain, "Since the pirate is gone

 

Go you down to your grog, go you down everyone

Go you down to your grog, me boys, and it's be of good cheer

For while we got sea-room, my boys, never fear."

"Go you down to your grog, me boys, and be of good cheer

For while we have sea-room, my boys, never fear".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poor Man's Heaven

 

(Philip Lumpkin) Poor man's heaven please, Order please for Poor Man's Heaven.

 

Now friends gather near I want you to hear a dream that I had last night

There's a land o'er the sea for you and for me, Where we won't have to struggle and fight

There's real feather beds where we lay our heads with a nice private room for each one

There's Shoes with soles and pants without holes and no work at up there to be done

 

 

In poor man's heaven we'll have our own way there's nothing up there but good luck

There's strawberry pie that's 20 feet high and whipped cream they bring in a truck

We'll Know how it feels in an an automobile with a footman to open the door

And if someone gets smart, we'll take them apart and spread them all over the floor

 

In poor man's heaven we'll have our own way no salt pork and beans over there

But we will be fed our breakfast in bed and served by a fat millionaire

We'll run all the banks to shoot all the cranks and we won't give a darn who we hurt

And the millionaire's son won't have so much fun when they put him to shovel the dirt

 

In poor man's we'll have our own way and we won't have nothing to fear

We'll eat all we please from ham and egg trees that grow by a lake full of beer

We'll live on champagne and ride on a train and sleep in a pullman that day

And if someone should dare to ask for our fare we'll hold out and put out his light

 

In poor man's heaven we'll have our own way no salt pork and beans over there

but we will be fed our breakfast in bed and served by a fat millionaire

We won't have to yearn for money to burn, we'll own a big money press

We'll run at full speed and make all we need and never need guard all the rest

 

The landlord we'll take and tie to a stake and make them give back all our dough

Then we'll let them sweat and learn what they get when they go to the hot place below

In poor man's Heaven We''ll own our own home and we won't have to work like a slave

But we will be proud to sing right out loud, The land of the free and the brave.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Foggy Dew

 

(Philip Lumpkin) We're just going to have the Foggy Dew from Douglas

 

Now when I was a bachelor, young and bold

I followed the roving trade

And all the harm that ever I done

I courted a servant maid.

I courted her all one summer

And part of the winter too

And every night I walked my love

All over the foggy dew

 

Now one night as I lay on my pillow

And I was fast asleep

Well there came a maiden to my bedside

How bitterly she did weep

She tore her hand, She rung her hair

She cried what shall I do

For I've resolved this very same night

To sleep along with you

 

Now all the fore part of that night

How we did sport and play

And all the latter part of that night

Why close in my arms she lay

And when it came to broad daylight

She cried "what shall I do"?

I said "hold your tongue you silly young thing

And think of the foggy dew.

 

Now Suppose that I should have a child

Oh Wouldn't it make you smile

If I should have a child by you, yes another one or two

Would it make you leave off your old ragged ways

And think of the foggy dew

Now I loved that girl dearly

As dear as I loved my life

But I never told her of my thoughts

No and I never intend to

For every time she cocks her leg

I thought of the foggy dew

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Indian Lass

 

As I walked out on a far distant shore

Oh I stepped into an ale house just to spend a half an hour

And while I sat smoking, a taking my glass,

There by chance stepped in a fine young indian lass.

And while I sat smoking and taking my glass,

There by chance stepped in a fine young indian lass.

 

Now she sat down beside me and she squeezed my hand

Saying"You are a young sailor, not one of this land"

"I have got good lodgings, if along a me you'll stay,"

"And my fortune I will share it without no delay".

"I have got good lodgings, if along a me you'll stay,"

"And my fortune I will share it without no delay".

 

Oh With a glass of good liquor she soon welcomed me in

Kind sir, you are welcome to have anything

And while I embraced her, this was her tune

"You are a young sailor and so far from your home".

And while I embraced her, this was her tune

"You are a young sailor and so far from your home".

 

We tossed and we tumbled into each others arms

And all that long night I embraced her sweet charms

And with romance, all enjoyment so the time it passed away

I did not go leave her until nine the next day

And with romance, all enjoyment so the time it passed away

And I did not go leave her until nine the next day

 

Now this loving young Indian on the place where she stood

I viewed her charming features and I found they were good

She was neat tall and handsome, and her age about 16,

Was bred and brought up in a place called Orleans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Duck Foot Sue

 

(Philip Lumpkin) Good order ladies and gentlemen please, good order ladies and gentlemen please,

We're now going to have a song from Mr Harry cook Duck Foot Sue, order please

 

Come listen for a while and I will tell to you

It's about a girl I love and they call her Duck foot Sue

She's gentle and devine long waisted in her feet

Her heels stuck out behind like an 18 carat beet

 

(Chorus) So Now I'll sing to you about my love so true

She was chief engineer in the white shirt laundry

Out in the back yard view

Her beauty was all she had she had a mouth like a soft shell crab

She'd an India rubber lip like a rudder of a ship and I tell you she was bad

 

She was not very fat or was she very thin

For she looked when she was dressed like a straw in a barrel of gin

I took her to a hall, a black man at the club

It took me half a quid for to stuff her out with grub

(Chorus)

 

For she was a funny old guy

She had a double barrel squint in her eye

She'd a number 10 feet they would cover up the street

She'd a mouth like a crack in a pie

She had a cheerfully cemetery laugh

She had a head like an excellent calf

She's a iron-clad gun, clipper built brig

All on a main top guard

(Chorus)

 

Her face was the colour of a ham

She had knees like a Japanese fan

She could talk for an hour like 40 horse power

And a voice like a catamaran

Her hair was an indigo blue

She could walk like a Kangaroo

You ought to see her tussle with a patent leather bustle

She could whistle like a steam boat too

(Chorus)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Underneath her Apron

 

(Philip Lumpkin) Order please for Underneath the apron

 

 

Now it was little Sarah with her pail and broom,

She had to loose her apron strings to give her belly room.

When in came her master, and unto her did say,

"Oh what is that you have got beneath your apron?"

 

"It's nothing, Sir, it's nothing sir,

Oh nothing Sir", said she.

"It's only a muslin gown my mother gave to me.

I had nowhere to put it, 'twas too tight to be worn

So I tucked it snugly underneath me apron."

 

After some months, a baby boy was born.

Born without a father, without a home at all.

When in came her master, and unto her did say

"did you get that from underneath your apron."

 

"Was it by a tinker, was it by a clown,

Was it by a soldier-boy who fights for England's crown?"

"No sir, it was by a sailor, who ploughs the angry sea,

Who was it who popped it underneath me apron."

 

"Now was it in the parlour, was it in the hall,

Was it in the larder, or in the house at all?"

"No sir it was in the garden, up against the wall,

When Jack he popped it underneath me apron."

 

Now all you pretty girls, Take this tip from me,

Never trust a sailor-boy one inch above your knee,

If you do, the sailor he'll haul your colours down,

And he'll drop his anchor underneath your apron.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pleasant and Delightful

 

(Philip Lumpkin) Order gentlemen please we're now just going to have a song from Velvet give us Pleasant and delightful

 

How pleasant and delightful it were mid summer's morn,

All the fields and the meadows they were covered with corn,

The blackbirds and thrushes sang on every green tree,

And the larks they sang melodious at the dawning of the day.

And the larks they sang melodious,

And the larks they sang melodious,

And the larks they sang melodious at the dawn of the day.

 

Said the sailor and his true love as were walking one day,

Said the sailor to his truelove, "I am bound far away,

I am bound to the Indias where the cannons they roar,

I must go and leave my Nancy, she is the girl I adore.

I must go and leave my Nancy,

I must go and leave my Nancy,

I must go and leave my Nancy, she's the girl I adore."

Then the ring from her finger she instantly drew,

 

Saying, "Take this dearest William and my heart shall go too."

And while I embraced her, tears from her eyes fell,

Saying, "May I go along with you", "oh no my love, farewell."

Saying, "May I go along with you,"

Saying, "May I go along with you,"

Saying, "May I go along with you", "oh no my love, farewell."

 

"Fare you well my lovely Nancy, I no longer can stay,

For a topsails they were hoisted, our anchor's aweigh.

Our ship lies awaiting for the next flowing tide,

And if ever I return again, I will make you my bride.

And if ever I return again,

And if ever I return again,

And if ever I return again, I'll make you my bride."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Blackbird

 

(Philip Lumpkin) Good order ladies and gentlemen please, we're now going to have a song from Mr A Cook. The Blackbird if you don't mind ladies and gentlemen please

 

I am but a poor girl; my misfortunes seem sad

Many months I've been courting a young sailor lad

I've courted him truly both noon, night and day

And now for a transport he's gone far away

 

(Chorus) Then if I were a blackbird, I would whistle and sing

I'd follow the vessel my true love sailed in

Whilst up in the top rigging I would there build my nest

And lay all night long on his lily-white breast.

 

My love's tall and handsome with every degree

His parents despise him because he loves me

Oh let them despise him and say what they will

While I've breath in my body, I'll love my lad still.

(Chorus)

 

Then if I were a scholar and could handle my pen

I'd write a long letter to my true love I'd send

I'd tell her my misfortunes, my sad, grief and woe

If I had wings like a dove to my true love I'd go.

(Chorus)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Farmer From Cheshire

 

There was an old farmer in Cheshire

To market his daughter did go

And thinking that no one would harm her

For she'd often been that way before

And thinking that no one would harm her

For she'd oft times been that way before

 

But this time she met with a Highwayman

His pistol he drew to her breast

Saying, 'Deliver your money your clothing.

Or you will die in distress.'

Saying, 'Deliver your money your clothing.

Or you will die in distress.'

 

Now he stripped the damsel stark naked

And he gave her the reigns for to hold

And there she stood shivering and shaking

Almost frozen to death in the cold

And there she stood shivering and shaking

Nearly frozen to death in the cold

 

Then she put her right foot in the stirrups

And saddled her horse like A man

Over hedges and ditches she galloped

crying get me you rogue if you can

Over hedges and ditches she galloped

crying get me you rogue if you can

 

Now the rogue he so quickly followed after

And he made his old horse puff and blow

And finding he couldn't overtake her

For she reached her father's own door

And finding he couldn't overtake her

For she reached her father's own door

 

'Oh daughter, oh daughter what's happened?

You've been at the market so long

'Oh father, I have been in great danger,

But the rogue he has done me no harm.'

'Oh father, I have been in great danger,

But the rogue he has done me no harm.'

 

Then she put her old horse in the stable,

And gave him some corn and some hay

And then she sat counting the money ,

From midnight to twilight next day

And then she sat counting her money ,

From midnight to twilight next day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Old Sow (2)

 

Now there was an old farmer he had an old sow

(Snort) here, there, had an old sow, had an old sow

Now there was an old farmer he had an old sow

Sing lassy fo lar a where um and there was an old man

With a (Snort) (rasberry) (whistle) a little old man

And this old sow had the best of straw

(Snort) here, there, best of straw,best of straw

And this old sow had the best of straw

Sing lassy fo lar a where um and there was an old man

With a (Snort) (rasberry) (whistle) a little old man

 

Now this old sow had nine little pigs

(Snort) here, there, nine little pigs, nine little pigs

Now this old sow had nine little pigs

Sing lassy fol lar a where um and there was an old man

With a (Snort) (rasberry) (whistle) a little old man

Now these nine little pigs had curly tails

(Snort) here, there, curly tails, curly tails

Now these nine little pigs had curly tails

Sing lassy fol lar a where um and there was an old man

With a (Snort) (rasberry) (whistle) a little old man

 

Now these nine little pigs and their bottoms all bear

(Snort) here, there , bottoms all bear,bottoms all bear

Now these nine little pigs and their bottoms all bear

Sing lassy fol lar a where um and there was an old man

With a (Snort) (rasberry) (whistle) a little old man

 

Now if you want any more you can sing it yourself

(Snort) here, there , sing it yourself, sing it yourself

Now if you want any more you can sing it yourself

Sing lassy fol lar a where um and there was an old man

With a (Snort) (rasberry) (whistle) a little old man


 

 

 

 


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